Notes From Our October Meeting

We had another fine turn-out for our October meeting, with some new and welcome faces.

  • We began by discussing the Coalition of Vancouver Neighbourhood’s all-candidates meeting.  The candidates’ responses re: the Heritage Action Plan were discussed.  It was also noted that all parties other than Vision had stated their opposition to the current Grandview Community Plan process.
  • The GHG presentation (by Penny and Brice) to the Community Plan’s Citizens’ Assembly on 4th October was briefly discussed.  The CA’s next meeting is on 25th October.
  • The sale of 2185 E. 5th was next up. With an asking price of about $1.6m, it was finally sold for over $1.9m, to a developer.  We understand he will probably do an HRA with infill, similar to Jeffs Residence. We will approach the realtor for a discussion of this and similar sales.
  • Next on the agenda was Brookhouse, 1872 Parker.  This is still sitting, apparently unoccupied but with the occasional light to be seen at night. There is no fresh news but, a couple of weeks ago, James Evans suggested that perhaps the current owner was realising his asking price is too high. So, maybe there is a still a hope for a sale to someone like James and then an HRA.
  • The history of the Howe House at Lakewood & Kitchener, and our method of tackling the mystery through directories, building permits, and censuses, was described. The family was tracked from a hotel in the West End at the turn of the century to Lakewood in the 1910s, and to a farm Langley in the 1920s.
  • Bruce Macdonald presented a first cut of his new 40-minute presentation work that describes the history of Grandview in terms that are specifically designed to be useful for considering the future of our neighbourhood. Very good conversation ensued.
  • One particular point that Bruce raises is that Grandview has been cut off from its sea shore, and very recently too.  There was general agreement that we need to regain that shore in some way despite the heightened security at the Port.
  • It was noted that the next GWAC Meeting, on Monday 3rd November at Astorino’s, will be a presentation of changes to Commercial Drive from a bike-lobby group.
  • Finally, we reviewed a request from Prof. David Brownstein for us to take another of his students to perform a project this year.  Last year’s exercise did not go particularly well, but we discussed a limited-focus idea about corner stores in Grandview.  This idea will be discussed further with Prof. Brownstein.

So good, so stimulating to meet with these folks every month.  Come join us!

Next meeting October 16th, 7 pm.

Another full agenda for our upcoming monthly meeting, held as always in the Britannia boardroom from 7 to 9 pm. All are welcome!

• Progress on heritage presentations to the Citizens Assembly

• The sale for $1,750,000 of 2185 East 3rd at Garden Park, one of only two Georgian-style houses in Grandview; it sits on two lots and could be demolished, but evidence would seem to suggest that the new owner will go for a Heritage Revitalization Agreement and infill the lots behind the heritage house ….

2185e3rd

• Update on the Brookhouse house at 1872 Parker, which has become terribly derelict since its new owner kicked out the tenants and set to redeveloping the double lot with duplexes. The photo below is from a year ago…

woodhouse

• A report on an interesting research project to track down the location of this house …

howehouse

… occupied a century ago by Samuel Howe which, according to the family story related to us by Judy Webber, his great granddaughter, stood at Venables and Victoria.

Bruce Macdonald will present his slide show on Grandview history with the planning process in mind. This is important in the effort to preserve Grandview’s heritage buildings, and in the effort to ‘keep Grandview the way it is,’ the comment that Garth Mullins made last year which got the biggest response at the big public meeting on the new Community Plan.

Early Immigrant Walking Tours: Strathcona

Strathcona, Vancouver’s historic east end, has been home to generations of immigrants from around the world. In the 1930s the local elementary school was called “the Little League of Nations” acknowledging the 33 nationalities that attended classes there. In the surrounding neighbourhood, local churches reflected the diversity and the evolving nature of immigration; a Lutheran church established by the Swedes had in a few short years a Norwegian and then German congregation before becoming the American Methodist Episcopal Fountain Chapel, home to the city’s growing black population.The streets and grocery stores were alive with Croatian, Russian, Jewish, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese and Chinese neighbours. A legacy that survives today includes grocery stores such as the Union Food Market and Benny’s Market, the pioneer Italian market. The Ukrainian and Russian community halls and a former synagogue, which was the city’s first, are also important sites in the development of Strathcona.

Join John Atkin or Maurice Guibord as we walk the streets and explore the rich diversity of this neighbourhood. The tour ends at Union Food Market which has been a traditional Portuguese grocery and bakery since 1962. Please note the October 16th tour will be given in French.

With John Atkin
Tuesday October 14th 2-4pm
Friday October 17th 4-6pm

With Maurice Guibord
Wednesday October 15th 2-4pm
Thursday October 16th 4-6pm (offered in French)

These tours are free of charge, however registration is required
Click here to register